Tamsin Egerton Interview
Tamsin Egerton Interview
Tamsin Egerton’s first film role was in the comedy Keeping Mum, alongside Rowan Atkinson and Maggie Smith in 2006. She then went on to play the bitchy Chelsea in both St Trinian’s remakes, and Cassandra in the Noel Clarke-directed 4.3.2.1. Recently in London, she spoke to View’s Matthew Turner about her latest role as posh girl Georgie in the British romcom Chalet Girl, also starring Felicity Jones and Ed Westwick.

So, this is fun, this film. I really enjoyed it.

Tamsin Egerton

Yes! It is fun.
What attracted you to it and how did you get involved?

Tamsin Egerton

It's a brilliant script, it really is. It reminded me of The Devil Wears Prada a bit, between Georgie [Tamsin's character] and Kim. I mean Georgie's quite sarcastic, quite dry, quite belittling and Kim's just this girl who's completely a fish out of water. And I just thought it was quite funny. It's quite a glossy script for something so British. And it wasn't a huge budget but it somehow looks like it was made for a lot more money. And obviously Felicity is a brilliant actress and I thought I'd love to work with her. The one thing I was worried about was it was very like Chelsea, the character I played in St Trinian's. They basically wanted her very similar to Chelsea so I tried to make her slightly different, as much as the writing would allow, but I thought the film deserved it because it was just so, so beautifully written. And just the great people that were attached. In fact, I got attached quite early on, knowing that Felicity was attached.
I'm going to do all the James Bond stuff, down the slopes, onto ski-mobiles...
I thought the friendship was really well written. Normally you expect them to be bitchy to each other for ages and then become friends by the end, but actually you became friends quite quickly and that was quite refreshing.

Tamsin Egerton

No, it is. It's really lovely. I think that is quite well put together, the complexities of all the relationships, between Ed and Sophia Bush and then between Ed and his dad and all that sort of thing. So I thought that was really cool. And yeah, it's just a really good movie and it's different – I mean, I can't remember the last snowboarding film. I mean, Hot Tub Time Machine but ...
Had you done any snowboarding or skiing beforehand?

Tamsin Egerton

Never. I was totally a novice. I was more like the Kim character, because I'd never skied, never snowboarded, had never been in a snowy country, just never saw the appeal. And then they gave me lessons in St Anton and I had four hours a day with Gunter, my instructor. And in the press notes it says that he was my hero and he might as well have had a whip. I don't remember saying that and I think that's quite ridiculously funny but, um -
You'd like to officially retract that?

Tamsin Egerton

I am officially retracting that, but Gunter was brilliant. I actually got quite accomplished from a beginning of sulking and walking down the slopes with my skis and being very upset about the whole thing, to suddenly being addicted and going every weekend, secretly, with Felicity, because of the insurance. And I absolutely loved it and I'm hooked now. I'm a hooked skier. But you can't see me do it! After all that training, you don't actually see me skiing in the film.
You don't ski in the film at all?

Tamsin Egerton

No. And there's a blooper reel at the end where I'm falling over, because that was in the beginning when we were still learning and so it's like I can't ski, which is really good. But I'm going to show people.
But officially, if another skiing movie comes up, you can ski?

Tamsin Egerton

Yeah, I'm going to do all the James Bond stuff, down the slopes, onto ski-mobiles, it's going to be good.
What was Phil [Traill] like as a director?

Tamsin Egerton

Brilliant. He's really laid back, he's just got a really young view and he's really chilled and funny. I think it's good when you're doing a comedy with a funny – well, it's more of a romantic film – but with a guy who's funny himself, so he gets comic timing. Because obviously, I like comedy and comic timing is everything, and sometimes if something isn't working he'll just be like, 'Well, why don't you wait here?' and, 'Actually, that's not as funny as you think it might be, do it like this,' and I'd be like, 'Oh, you're right. Oh, that's annoying.' Or vice versa. So that's really great, when somebody gets it.

With Felicity he was able to pull such raw performances out and I think he wanted to keep it natural and real throughout, because it's so easy to go over the top with these characters, such is the way they're written. He's our friend as well, he'd go out with us for drinks. We all got very close, because I think you do when you go abroad, especially when you're in a random little town in Germany. You all bond and I think that really helps. And yeah, we just all really respected him and his opinion and I think that's important. I'd love to work with him again, he's brilliant.
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Content updated: 21/11/2018 19:54

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