Final Destination 2 (15)

Film image

The ViewLondon Review

StarStarStarNo StarNo Star
Review byMatthew Turner05/02/2003

Three out of Five stars
Running time: 90 mins

Satisfying sequel, even if it lacks the originality of its predecessor – a good-looking cast, a tongue in cheek script and some inventive death sequences make this worth watching.

Inevitably, in Hollywood, if something makes money, a sequel will surely follow, regardless of how silly the title looks with a “2” stuck next to it. The original Final Destination was a bona fide sleeper hit back in 2000, taking an original idea and milking it for all it was worth - the set-up was unusual, the deaths were inventively nasty and the script was knowing and witty without ever devolving into parody.

However, while you can happily argue that the film didn’t exactly need a sequel, Final Destination 2 is just as much fun as its predecessor, if you like that sort of thing.

Almost Exactly The Same

The set-up is almost exactly the same. Exactly a year after the plane crash of the first movie, a cute lead (a girl this time – step forward A.J. Cook, a sort of cut-price Katie Holmes) has a premonition while in a car with her friends waiting to join the freeway.

Interestingly, the premonition somehow involves a scene of gratuitous nudity, as well as a horribly gruesome multi-car pile-up, complete with bouncing logs. Understandably freaked out, she pulls over, blocking the lane and thereby saving the lives of all those waiting in the cars behind her.

The survivors quickly figure out that they have cheated Death, though they are all familiar with the events of the first film. And, sure enough, when Death claims a couple of them in the order in which they would have died in the accident, the rest of them figure out what’s going on and try to stay one step ahead of the Reaper.

They are helped by Clear Rivers (Ali Larter), the only survivor from the first film, and they also drop in on Tony Todd (whose cameo in the first film was a creepy highlight, but who is more or less wasted here).

Pick A Victim

The cast are pretty good and the fact that they’re total unknowns means that you can have fun guessing who’ll make it to the end. Though caricatures on paper (urban black guy, stoner, uptight career woman etc) the actors do enough to make you actually care about them. There’s even a surprisingly touching scene where the stoner, realising that he’s probably doomed, gives his house-keys to someone, asking them to “please throw out my drugs and porn and anything else that would break my Mom’s heart” if he dies.

The death scenes themselves are extremely gory and very inventive – the special effects work is highly impressive. The scenes are also Well directed, with many of them unfolding in an unexpected manner. Importantly, the film never actually personifies Death, preferring you to think that Death is all around us. One thing’s for certain – you’ll definitely take care driving home.

If the film has a flaw, it’s only that, fairly obviously, it lacks the freshness of the original film. Similarly, the ending is disappointing if you’ve seen the first film.

In short, fans of the original film wanting more of the same won’t be disappointed, and if you haven’t seen the first one, then this is an enjoyable horror flick in its own right with more than enough scares to keep you interested. Recommended.

Film Trailer

Final Destination 2 (15)
Be the first to review Final Destination 2...
image
01 Focus (15)

Will Smith, Margot Robbie, Rodrigo Santoro

image
02 Selma (12A)

David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

image
03 Far from the Madding Crowd (tbc)

Carey Mulligan, Tom Sturridge, Matthias Schoenaert...

image
04 Chappie (tbc)

Hugh Jackman, Sigourney Weaver, Sharlto Copley

image
05 A Most Violent Year (15)

Oscar Isaac, Jessica Chastain, David Oyelowo

Content updated: 19/10/2017 19:21

Latest Film Reviews

Film of the Week

Foxcatcher (15)

Steve Carrell and Channing Tatum star in this real life inspired story of Olympic talent, fierce competition and murder.

UK Box Office Top 5 Films